DUI Underage

Drunk Driving & DWI conviction


Concerns about DUI Underage and Repeat DUI Offenders

Driving while intoxicated with children within the same car is very dangerous due to its severity of outcomes if there is an accident involved at the end. Studies show that parents are the most influential when it comes to drinking at home, and it can potentially impact their minds and result in an increase in teenage DUI nowadays. We can see two major groups that are vulnerable to this hazardous potential on the roads, if they are driving under any influence, either alcohol or drugs:

- Teenagers (This group already has a high risk for accidents)
- Regular hardcore drinkers

When they are caught by the police, a typical routine of examining their status of soberness will be done via breathalyzer test, blood test, or field sobriety test. Most of the cases reveal that they are intoxicated at the very first test on the road, however there are always other options such as extracting blood stream and have the lab prove it. After all, if repeat offenders or teenagers are found to be drunk, they will have stricter penalties than normal offenders.

DUI Underage

For example:

In the state of California, the “Zero Tolerance” law sets a much lower blood alcohol limit or prohibits any alcohol presence for drivers not 21. Plus, repeat DUI offenders will face harsher sentences if they’re caught driving under the influence or have been involved with a traffic accident that results in either an injury or death.

For example: Los Angeles Angels’ pitcher Nick Adenhart was killed by a drunk driver. He was charged with second degree murder rather than manslaughter due to a previous DUI. He also signed a court form that stated that if he was caught drinking and driving and killed someone, his liability could increase. If you’ve been injured or someone you know has been killed by a repeat offender or drunk teenage drivers, your lawyer can successfully discuss your case.


More Facts About DUI Underage Drinkers and Hardcore Drinkers

A look At DUI Underage Drinkers (Teenagers)

According to the National Traffic Safety Administration, about 60 percent teenagers and young adults (ages 16 to 24) are fatality victims in accidents where drugs or alcohol are involved.

Now, a good deal of teenagers cannot get liquor for themselves. However, a minute dose can significantly increase their BAC to around .05 percent. This also increases their odds of experiencing a fatal car accident by seven times. Plus, male drivers are two times more probable to be killed from DUI underage accidents than female DUI underage accidents.

On top of that, teenagers are much more likely to get into a vehicle accident after they’ve been drinking even if their BAC level is low, thus teenagers and DUI are becoming serious matters in our society.. After all, it’s their driving inexperience coupled with the alcohol that keeps them from identifying road dangers and make safe judgments.

A Look At Hardcore Drinkers

Hardcore drinker is the tern to recognize repeat DUI offenders. These offenders have been repeatedly cautioned against and fined for drinking and driving and still do it. And, regardless of the repercussions, they continue to drink then drive.

According one federal study, repeat DUI drivers are 1.8 times more likely to be involved in fatal wrecks if they were convicted within three years. Not only are they more likely to have a fatal accident, their BAC level will be about .10 percent or higher.

Vehicle accidents are significantly higher for underage or teenagers who are driving after they have been drinking. Although their BAC level is low, their inexperience behind the wheel and the combination of alcohol, keeps them from recognizing the road hazards and making safe judgments… all of it leading to more wrecks, thus teenagers and DUI are becoming serious matters in our society.

 

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